Capilano University is committed to addressing sexual violence and misconduct through promoting awareness, enhancing understanding and taking measures to prevent and respond to reports of sexual violence and misconduct through policy, practice and education.

Capilano University established a Presidential Advisory Committee on Sexual Violence and Misconduct composed of representatives from across the University community in November 2016. This committee was charged with developing University policy and procedures relating to Sexual Violence and Misconduct. Both the Sexual Violence and Misconduct Policy and Procedures have been approved with input from students, faculty and staff.

Capilano University is committed to creating and maintaining a learning and working environment characterized by mutual respect, safety, civility and free inquiry. The University does not tolerate or condone behaviour which contributes to a hostile, inequitable or an unsafe learning or working environment.

All members of the University community have the right to work, teach and study in an environment that is free from all forms of sexual violence and misconduct. Safety and security at the University are top priorities and any form of sexual violence and misconduct will not be tolerated. The University expects all members of the University community to abide by all laws and University policies.

What is sexual assault?

Sexual assault is any form of sexual contact that occurs without ongoing and freely given consent, including the threat of sexual contact without consent. Sexual assault can be committed by a stranger, someone is known to the survivor or an intimate partner.

Sexual assault can include any form of unwanted:

  • touching
  • kissing
  • groping
  • fondling
  • forced sexual intercourse (including oral and anal)
  • attempted forced sexual intercourse

Consent

Consent is an active, direct, voluntary and conscious choice and agreement between adults to engage in sexual activity. It is the responsibility of the person initiating or pursuing the sexual activity to obtain consent at all stages of sexual engagement. More specifically, consent:

  • is a freely given “yes”;
  • cannot be assumed or based on a perception that it was implied;
  • cannot be given by someone who is incapacitated (by drugs and/or alcohol), asleep, unconscious, or otherwise incapable of providing consent;
  • can be revoked at any time, regardless of whatever other sexual activities have taken place;
  • can never be obtained through threats, intimidation, coercion or other pressure tactics;
  • cannot be obtained if someone abuses a position of trust, power or authority, and
  • cannot be assumed from previous consent. 

The following video provides an excellent illustration of consent.