Past Graphic Novels

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      Dark Victory

      Batman: Dark Victory
      by Jeph Loeb & Tim Sale
      Michael's Pick

      The rare sequel that lives up to its predecessor, Dark Victory is a follow-up to the brilliant Long Halloween. It chronicles the rise of Two Face after Harvey Dent’s fall in The Long Halloween, and introduces the first (and best) Robin, Dick Grayson. (Fun fact: there have been 5 different canonical Robins.)
      Hush

      Batman: Hush
      by Jeph Loeb & Jim Lee
      Michael's Pick

      Hush is my favorite Batman graphic novel of all-time (The Long Halloween is a very close second). Unlike Jeph Loeb’s other Batman works, this takes place not at the beginning of the Dark Knight’s career, but at its peak: at a time when his “gallery of rogues” is fully established, and he has almost as many allies in his fight against them. If you’ve read any of the other stuff we have by Loeb, you know what to expect: a plot full of twists and turns and red herrings, as a new villain in town (or is he new…? dun dun dun!) manipulates pretty much every Batman character you’ve ever heard of (along with some you haven’t) in pursuit of a personal vendetta against the Dark Knight.
      The Long Halloween

      Batman: The Long Halloween
      by Jeph Loeb & Tim Sale
      Michael's Pick

      One of the best graphic novels of all-time, this is a mystery set early on in Batman’s career. A serial killer who murders people on holidays is loose in Gotham. What sets this story apart from many superhero stories is the writing – the art isn’t particularly great, but that is more than made up for by the fact Jeph Loeb is a master storyteller. Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy was heavily influenced by both The Long Halloween and its sequel, Dark Victory.
      Catwoman

      Catwoman: When in Rome
      by Jeph Loeb & Tim Sale
      Michael's Pick

      The final part of the Long Halloween trilogy, this tells where Catwoman disappeared to in the middle of Dark Victory. The answer, it turns out, is Italy, and provides a much better and far more fascinating origin story for Selina Kyle than the incredibly stupid one in Frank Miller’s overrated Year One (in which, as is typical of Miller, she’s a prostitute). While this is definitely the weakest part of the Long Halloween trilogy, it’s still very, very good.
      Fun Home

      Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic
      by Alison Bechdel
      Dalene’s Pick

      Do not pick up this book unless you have enough time to read it all in one sitting. I actually hid from my family so I could finish it!!
      An Iranian Metamorphosis

      An Iranian Metamorphosis
      by Mana Neyestani
      Dalene’s Pick

      A cartoon with a cockroach and a misinterpreted word in the leisure section of an Iranian newspaper landed cartoonist Mana Neyestani and his editor in an Iranian prison for many years. A compelling read!
      Maus

      Maus Part I
      by Art Spiegelman
      Michael's Pick

      The first graphic novel to win the Pulitzer Prize, this tells a Holocaust story (that of the author’s father) where the Jews are mice and the Nazis are cats. There is more to this book than that clever premise, however, as the author follows through with an unflinching look at the horrors his father lived through.
      Step Aside, Pops

      Step Aside, Pops
      by Kate Beaton
      Michelle’s Pick

      The author, Kate Beaton, shows her “fully-evolved storytelling” (from the Forbes review) with humorous and satirical tones. I am happy to recommend this book to anyone who likes history and hilarious comics. The book spent six months on the New York Times Bestseller List and was on 25 Best of the Year lists.
      This One Summer

      This One Summer
      by Mariko & Jillian Tamaki
      Dalene’s Pick

      Mariko Tamaki teamed up with her cousin Jillian Tamaki, an illustrator, and perfectly captured the time when you transition from being a kid to a young adult. Love that the whole novel is done in shades of purple.